Ordinance 8.42 and Resolution 2024-1: At the January 11, 2024 meeting the Town Board adopted Ordinance 8.42 Fee for Non-emergency Lift Assistance and Resolution 2024-1 Non-Emergency Lift Asistance Fee Resolution. The ordinance will take effect on Friday, February 2, 2024. Please contact Town Hall at 262-763-3070 with any questions.    Fee for Non-Emergency Lift Assistance Sections 8.42.00 Purpose 8.42.01 Definitions 8.42.03 Determination of Non-emergency Lift Assist 8.42.04 Assessment of fee 8.42.05 Waiver of Imposition 8.42.06 Billing, Delinquency, and Collection 8.42.07 Appeal from Administrative Decision 8.42.00 Purpose The purpose of this Chapter is to enact a penalty fee to discourage the use of the 911 emergency system to dispatch personnel of the Town of Burlington or its contractors and partners for non- emergency lift assistance. The intent is to provide a disincentive for the practice of using publicly-funded emergency services to provide non-emergency assistance. 8.42.01 Definitions For the purpose of this section, the following terms, phrases, words, and their derivations shall have the meanings given: “Lift assist” means a response by the emergency response unit of a private contractor of the Town or the unit of another public safety department providing automatic or mutual aid to the Town in lifting an uninjured fallen person to a pre-fall position. “Non-emergency/emergency” means a determination, based upon an assessment by the commanding officer or Lead EMT of the emergency response unit, that there is not an emergency medical condition or medical necessity justifying the presence of the emergency unit at the facility. 8.42.03 Determination of Non-emergency Lift Assist Based upon the assessment undertaken by the commanding officer or Lead EMT of an emergency response unit dispatched and their determination that no emergency medical condition or emergency medical necessity exists, the officer shall declare the incident a non-emergency lift assist in their incident report. 8.42.04 Assessment of fee Fire Chief, or designee, shall be authorized to issue a fee for each incident determined to be non- emergency lift assist. The fee for providing such lift assist shall be for services accumulated in a single calendar year from January 1 through December 31. The amount of the non-emergency lift assistance per incident penalty fee shall be established by resolution of the Town Board. Breakdown categories for charging fees are:     1 or 2 assists to a single address – No fee     3 to 5 assists to a single address     6 to 7 assists to a single address     8 to 9 assists to a single address     Each additional occurrence above 9   assists to a single address 8.42.05 Waiver of Imposition In the event the Fire Chief, or designee, determines that Town’s assessment or determination of a response as a non-emergency lift assist was in error or there were other mitigating facts which the commanding officer did not possess at the time of the incident, the Fire Chief, or designee, may waive imposition of the applicable fee(s). 8.42.06 Billing, Delinquency, and Collection The property owner will be invoiced at the beginning of each month for lift assistance at the residence. Any bill or invoice for the fee imposed pursuant to this ordinance shall be considered delinquent upon the expiration of the time allowed for payment, which is thirty (30) days from the date of the invoice. If the payment is not received by the next invoice cycle, a late fee of $25.00 will be applied for every thirty (30) days in which the payment is past due. Any unpaid invoice over sixty (60) days will receive a final written notice mailed out on November 1st of each year requesting payment in full before unpaid balance is added to the property tax bill as a delinquent charge, if the obligated party is also the property owner. 8.42.07 Appeal from Administrative Decision Any party subject to a fee under the provisions of this section shall have a right of appeal to the Fire Chief, or designee. A notice of appeal must be submitted in writing no later than ten days after issuance of the notice of the fee and must be directed to the Fire Chief, at the address listed on the notice of fee. The written appeal should include the fee reference number and the party’s reasoning why the determination of notice of non-emergency lift assist should be reconsidered. Within 30 days of receipt of a written appeal, an impartial review of the appeal shall be completed by the Town Board and a recommendation shall be presented to the Fire Chief, or designee, for final decision, which will be reported to the appellant in writing.  The appellant shall have the opportunity to speak and present evidence at such meeting before the Town Board.  Unless a notice of appeal is properly filed in accordance with this section within ten days of the issuance of notice of fee, said fee is deemed final.   NON-EMERGENCY LIFT ASSISTANCE FEE RESOLUTION Resolution 2024- 1 WHEREAS, the Town of Burlington Code of Ordinances, Chapter 8.42, which provides for non-emergency lift assistance penalty fee WHEREAS, said chapter of the Town of Burlington Code of Ordinances allows the town to establish the amount of said fees by resolution. IT IS HEREBY RESOLVED, the following fees will be collected: 1 or 2 assists to a single address No Fee 3 to 5 assists to a single address $150.00 6 to 7 assists to a single address $200.00 8 to 9 assists to a single address $250.00 10 or more assists to a single address $300.00     

TEST TW WEATHER

Associated Appraisal Consultants, Inc. to start field work for revaluation

Associated Appraisal Consultants, Inc. will begin the field work for the Town’s revaluation on Monday, June 20th, 2022. To make accurate assessments, it is necessary for Associated Appraisal to conduct an interior and exterior review of all residences, apartments and businesses in the Town. A brief interior walk-through is necessary for consideration of the features, quality, and condition of each residence or structure. These factors can significantly impact market value. This notice is an official request to view the interior of your residence so we can properly assess your property. Please note we have no interest in your housekeeping or your personal belongings. If you wish to refuse an interior inspection, contact our office. As part of our data collection process, the assessor will be taking exterior photos of your property.

The assessors will begin working in your neighborhood during the next several weeks. All staff members from Associated Appraisal will carry a letter of introduction from the Town of Burlington, a photo ID, and drive a red vehicle displaying the Associated Appraisal company name. If no one is home when visiting a property, a door hanger will be placed on the main entrance with property-specific instructions on how to schedule an interior review. Please wait for the door hanger to schedule your appointment – appointments are not available prior to this green tag. If you own rental property in the Town, please inform your tenants that we will be visiting that property soon, so we can have their full cooperation for this review.

Notices of Assessment will be mailed when the property reviews are complete, and an assessment is determined for each property. Property owners will have an opportunity to discuss the assessed values with an Associated Appraisal representative at the Open Book session. After the Open Book session, property owners can appeal an assessment to the Board of Review. The Notice of Assessment will contain the Open Book and Board of Review dates. Property assessment and appeal information is available at: http://www.revenue.wi.gov/pubs/slf/pb060.pdf.

PROPERTY OWNER RIGHTS

Section 70.32 of the Wisconsin Statutes states, the value of real property should be based on “actual view.” If an assessor is not allowed access to view a property, the assessment value is based on “the best information that the assessor can practicably obtain …” This means an assessor must estimate the value of property using the information they have available to them.

To ensure receiving a complete and accurate valuation, it benefits the homeowner to allow the assessor access to view the interior of their residence. For the purposes of valuation if access is denied, the assessor will then base the valuation on the next best information available. However, if facts exist making an interior view necessary to complete an accurate valuation, the assessor may seek a special inspection warrant per section 66.0119 of the Wisconsin Statutes to view the interior of the home.

Section 70.05(4n) of the Wisconsin statutes requires the following notice: You have the right to refuse entry onto your residence pursuant to section 70.05(4m) of the Wisconsin statutes. Entry to view your property is prohibited unless voluntarily authorized by you. Pursuant to section 70.05(4m) of the Wisconsin statutes, you have the right to refuse a visual inspection of the interior of your residence and your refusal to allow an interior inspection of your residence will not be used as the sole reason for increasing your property tax assessment. Refusing entry to your residence also does not prohibit you from objecting to your assessment pursuant to section 70.47(7) of the Wisconsin statutes.

COMMON ASSESSMENT QUESTIONS

Some of my neighbors have told me the only reason for the reassessment is to raise taxes. Is this true?

No. a reassessment has no impact on the total amount of taxes collected. However, it may change your property’s percentage share of total taxes collected to increase, decrease or, have a minimal effect.

Why do you need to inspect the interior of my home?

There is no question that an inspection is an inconvenience. For that, we apologize. However, building size, age, features, quality, and condition, along with many other factors affect the market value of your property. The only way to ensure a Fair Market Value is to collect current exterior and interior data for each property. We are not concerned with your housekeeping nor personal belongings. This information will not be recorded and kept confidential.

How does the assessor value property?

Wisconsin law requires that property assessments be based on Fair Market Value. Estimating the market value of your property is a matter of determining the price a typical buyer would pay for it in its present condition. Some factors the assessor considers are: what similar properties are selling for; what it would cost to replace your property; the rent it may earn; and any other factors that affect value. It is important to remember that the assessor does not create assessed value, but rather interprets what is happening in the market place through real estate sales.

What can I do to ensure a fair and reasonable assessed value for my property?

Even with the best of care and intentions, errors are possible. Inform the assessor of any problems that might affect market value. There will be an opportunity to discuss your assessment with the assessor at the Open Book. Should you feel your assessment is in error, bring to the Open Book any documentation that supports your opinion of value. Property owners will be notified if there is a change to their assessment, when the project is completed. If the discussion with the assessor does not resolve your concerns, a Board of Review will be held where you can again present sales or other market value evidence that shows the assessment to be in error.

Do all assessments change at the same rate?

No, not necessarily. There are differences between individual properties and between neighborhoods. In one area, the sales may indicate a substantial increase in value in a given year. Yet in another neighborhood for example, there may be no change in value, or even a decrease in property values. Different types of properties within the same neighborhood may also show different value changes. For example, one-story houses may be more in demand than two-story houses, or vice versa. Older homes in the same area may be rising in value more slowly than newer homes. Perhaps the older style homes that have been traditionally selling low are now selling much higher. There are numerous factors to be considered in each property, which will cause the values to differ. Some of the factors which  can affect value are: location, condition, size, quality, number of baths, number of bedrooms, basement finish,  garages, overall condition as well as many others.

What is the bottom line?

Assessments are required by state law and are mandatory. The real issue is whether your property is assessed at the statutory required market value. Look at your final assessment after the revaluation. If it appears to be an accurate value when compared to sales of similar property, then it probably is a fair assessment. If, in your opinion, it does not reflect the market value of your property when compared to sales of similar properties, you should talk to our assessment staff. We may be able to provide information or take further actions to resolve your concerns.